R.Negron rayo & honey .jpg

I am a textile artist who creates goods combining cultural consciousness and clean design aesthetic.

I was born and raised in Nyack NY, a small town on the hudson river 45 mins north of NYC with Victorians on the waterfront and a main street of mom-and-pop antique shops. Nyack was where my interest in design and architecture was rooted; as a little girl, I helped refurbish tiger wood oak dressers and art deco armoires with my mother, who tucked handwritten affirmations into mirror frames.

My fascination in “how people live” comes from sleepovers at some truly incredible homes my childhood friend’s mother house-sat during the summer months. Experiencing up close and personal how people I had never met approached their interiors impacted my own sense of style and desire to fill my spaces with inspirational pieces.

With my company rayo & honey, I utilize typography and draw on literature, affirming quotes, and urban pop-culture references to create handmade pennants and other home goods with positive intent, resulting in soulful pieces with a timeless aesthetic. My intent is to create art for people who believe that that there is incredible power in the things we choose to surround ourselves with.

I’m kept on my toes by the wild ride of motherhood and partnership by my 12yr old boy-girl twins and literary editor partner with whom I reside with on the banks of the New York Bay in Brooklyn.

What Does Black History Month Mean To You This Year?

This image for me represents how much Black History there is for me to still discover. I look at this prairie settler couple in the 1800’s often in my phone. There’s so much to consume in it! The crisp clothing, the way this gentleman's hat is slight cocked just so, the baby that is the future, the not so small house behind them and my favorite detail: this free black woman's hand resting on her hip.

This image for me represents how much Black History there is for me to still discover. I look at this prairie settler couple in the 1800’s often in my phone. There’s so much to consume in it! The crisp clothing, the way this gentleman's hat is slight cocked just so, the baby that is the future, the not so small house behind them and my favorite detail: this free black woman's hand resting on her hip.

Celebration of the the Black American experience is practiced in all that I do, 365 days a year.  During Black History month, our voices are amplified to a higher decibel that really should be held everyday. For me, the goodness of Black History Month is discovering and sharing new artists, writers and creatives that may not otherwise be on my radar. I believe by consciously documenting and consuming our collective narratives and individual creative pursuits, we can continue to learn from the past and be prepared for the future.

Where Are You Finding Inspiration To Design This Year?

Ashley’s sack.jpg

My great grandmother Rose
mother of Ashley gave her this sack when
she was sold at age 9 in South Carolina
it held a tattered dress 3 handfulls of
pecans a braid of Roses hair. Told her
It be filled with my Love always
she never saw her again
Ashley is my grandmother
Ruth Middleton
1921

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the things that has stayed with me & impacted my work since visiting the NMAAH last year is Ashley’s sack. Embroidered by a Black women in 1921 with an account of her great grandmother’s enduring love for her grandmother during slavery is a beautiful heartbreaking testament to who we are as people.

This year I am releasing a new line of home goods. I’ve found that researching design and fabrication has introduced me to so many talented designers. Instagram is my go-to for daily bits of visual inspiration. I’m moved by the subtle details of vintage books. While my work until now has used the written word, I’ve been exploring the graphic design of books by Black presses. I’m looking forward to continuing my research in The Schomburg Library incredible archive.  

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